Erika Simms of Colorado Culture Magazine Hiking Boulder Colorado

ERIKA SIMMS

EDITOR & WRITER

Erika Simms was born in Anchorage, Alaska. Her parents, both outdoor adventurers, fostered her love for nature from a young age. Defining memories from growing up in Alaska include climbing in the Chugach Mountains, camping in bear country, and meeting Smokey the Bear at Portage Glacier. After a stopover in Washington, Erika moved to Colorado in 2010 and fell in love with the state. Thirteen years later, she created Colorado Culture Magazine. When Erika isn’t writing stories about colorful Colorado, she can be found on the hiking trails, ski slopes, and gravel roads.
Actors during action scene at Dickens Opera House in 1907
February In Colorado History
Colorado’s first wildlife protection laws are passed, Dickens Opera House features opening performance, Moffat Tunnel welcomes first train.
10th Mountain Division soldiers push car out of snow in Colorado in 1940s
The Perils Of Colorado Winter Driving From Decades Past
A collection of historic images from the annals of Colorado history illustrates the perils faced by early motorists navigating winter conditions.
Fossil Wasp Palaeovespa (Florissant Fossil Beds Colorado)
Ancient Insect Discoveries From Across Colorado (Part 2)
Colorado's ancient bugs have fascinating stories to tell. In the second part of a two-part series, we're looking at prehistoric dung beetles, wasps, and tsetse flies.
People At Slum Dwellings In Boulder Jungle Town (1920)
Boulder Was Once Blighted With Slums
Welcome to Jungle Town, the vanished slums of Boulder that pockmarked the city with squalor and destitution over a century ago.
Barn Owls (Audubon Watercolor)
Audubon Watercolors Bring Colorado Owls To Life
Nearly 200 years ago, John J. Audubon published a collection of watercolor paintings depicting the diverse species of birds found in North America. Included in his works were the majestic owls of Colorado.
Rocky Mountain Columbines
The Hundred-Year Controversy Over Colorado's State Song
How the omission of a single word sparked a decades-long debate over Colorados' quest for the perfect state song.